Better Drive in Logic X for a real Hammond

In a previous post I explained how to use the Rotor plugin and the Overdrive to add a bit of drive and Leslie emulation to a real Hammond while recording on Logic Pro X. Further along experimentation with this setup, I’ve ditched the Overdrive plugin, and have switched to using the Distortion II / Growl Distortion Light as a favourite driver for the Rotor Leslie emulation. This gives a very convincing bit of dirt to the sound. Here’s an example:

Hammond Leslie Emulation And Recording In Logic Pro X

Something else I’ve been experimenting with, with better and better results, is using the Rotor in Logic, based on  suggestions from Jim at the Organ Forum. If you combine this with the overdrive, or one of the amp simulators (‘Moving Air’ is a good one) you can get very good results, and this works very well for recording, taking the signal directly from the line-out on my A-102; I’ve been struggling with how the Vent is sitting in the mix, and the levels I get from it. This may just be related to my own setup, but I’m pretty much using Overdrive / Amp modeller / Rotor now, sometimes using Spreader and Exciter for an even bigger sound, and either the standard bus 2 platinum reverb (add other buses with reflections to taste) or a modelled reverb room.

Don’t forget to set the record mode to Latch or Write to capture Leslie-switch events (I send my CU-1 through a foot switch input on my interface for slow / fast switching).

For an example how this sounds:

How to date your Hammond Console

I’ve compiled a list from  information available on the internet that may help date a Hammond console (A-100, C3, B3, D-100, RT-3)

1958 – Vibrato line box changed from wood to metal

1960 – Side blocks change from wood to plastic

1961 – Pilot lamp added

1962 – Vibrato knob changed from smooth to ribbed (‘fluted’)

Mid-1962 – AO28 transformer colour change from silver to black

Spring 1964 –  Start of using red caps

1965 – Hammond script changed from small to large with new logo

1965 – Foam replaces felt

1965 – Introduction of R/C (resistor/capacitor) networks to tones 37-48 to reduce hum and crosstalk

1969 – Drawbar plastic knob style change to have engraved tones

Additional information can be gleaned from the components in the organ. Speakers (A-100 series) are usually stamped with a production date; the same applies for tubes / valves as well as capacitors.

Tubes overview

Here’s some information I found on the tubes / valves in Hammond consoles (A100-series, D100-series, B3,  C3,  RT3)

A0-28 pre-amp:  6X4, 12AX7/ECC83, 12AU7/ECC82, 12BH7, 6AU6 (2), 6C4 (2x)

A0-35 reverb-amp: 6X4, 12AX7/ECC83, 12AU7/ECC82, 12BH7, 6AU6 (2), 6C4 (2x)

A0-44 reverb-amp: 6CA4/EZ81, 6GW8/ECL86(2x)

A0-39 power-amp: 5U4GB, 12AX7/ECC83,  6BQ5/EL84/6P14 (2x)